Archive for the ‘religion’ Category

Is Wright Right?

Soundbytes are not usually fair representations of significant issues and always inappropriate when used out of context.  He who has ears to hear, let him hear what these two pastors are saying: 

followed by this…

Now that you’ve heard more from these pulpits, does that change your perspective?  One is Obama’s pastor.  One is McCain’s spiritual advisor.  If only Obama would change his position on abortion, then he would at least be consistent with the overall message given by these ministers.  I’ve got to admit, that while I feel very blessed to be an American, I also don’t always feel that America deserves God’s blessing.  I think most people can understand that distinction.  After watching these longer clips, I’m reminded of the necessity for prayer on my knees, “God save America.”  

Human Life Begins at Fertilization

from abort73.com

Christians Need Not Apply

In yet another disturbing public school incident, it seems that First Amendment Rights apply to everyone but Christian students.

“Pray” is considered the new four-letter word

The Common Cause club at Mountain Ridge High School in Arizona simply wanted to exercise the same rights given to other student organizations.The school district permits student club members to submit written announcements to be read over the school’s public address system, as well as video announcements to be played to the student body. In these announcements, club members are allowed to inform the student body not only of club meeting logistics (date, time, and location), but also to share information about the specific types of activities that will occur.

As an example, the Young Democrats of America club aired a video announcement which shared the following information:

  • “In 2006, young voters ages 18-29 supported Democratic candidates by an impressive 58%”
  • “Remember …we’re young. We’re Democrats. We’re Voting”

On the other hand, Common Cause club has been prohibited from communicating even the fact that religious activities will take place at its meetings.

On January 14, 2007, a club representative, Erin, submitted a weekly announcement which read, “Common Cause will be having weekly prayer every Friday morning at 7:20 at the administration flagpole, come join us!” The same day, the club submitted a video message communicating, “Our motto is…don’t worry about anything…instead, PRAY about everything! Common Cause presents…we pray…together…encouragingly…hopefully…upliftingly.”

The next day, Erin met with the school’s assistant principal and was told that her written and video announcements would not be allowed because they contained the words “prayer” and “pray.”

The assistant principal claimed the announcements would violate the supposed “separation of church and state.” When Erin responded that the First Amendment provided protection for such announcements, the assistant principal claimed none of that mattered. In other words, the First Amendment did not matter! Erin then asked to have the announcement back, but the assistant principal, perhaps in an attempt to assert her authority, ripped it up in front of her and discarded it.

With situations like this becoming increasingly common, it seems that “pray” has become the new four-letter word. While clubs like the Young Democrats of America, the Gay-Straight Alliance, and Students Against Destructive Decisions are allowed to operate freely on school grounds, expression of religion is prohibited.

The Dark Side of Evolutionary Thought

In the blogging world this excellent lecture is quite long (about 52 min.), but it is well worth the time for anyone who recognizes that ideas, especially bad ideas, have consequences.

Vodpod videos no longer available. from www.frcblog.org posted with vodpod

Conservatives, “It’s About the Justices Stupid”

The economy is always a pressing issue for any President, but the nomination and appointment of federal judges, especially Supreme Court Justices lives decades beyond any Presidency. –Jay

The conservative movement has made enormous gains over the past three decades in restoring constitutional government. The Roberts Supreme Court shows every sign of building on these gains.

Yet the gulf between Democratic and Republican approaches to constitutional law and the role of the federal courts is greater than at any time since the New Deal. With a Democratic Senate, Democratic presidents would be able to confirm adherents of the theory of the “Living Constitution” — in essence empowering judges to update the Constitution to advance their own conception of a better world. This would threaten the jurisprudential gains of the past three decades, and provide new impetus to judicial activism of a kind not seen since the 1960s.

We believe that the nomination of John McCain is the best option to preserve the ongoing restoration of constitutional government. He is by far the most electable Republican candidate remaining in the race, and based on his record is as likely to appoint judges committed to constitutionalism as Mitt Romney, a candidate for whom we also have great respect.

We make no apology for suggesting that electability must be a prime consideration. The expected value of any presidential candidate for the future of the American judiciary must be discounted by the probability that the candidate will not prevail in the election. For other kinds of issues, it may be argued that it is better to lose with the perfect candidate than to win with an imperfect one. The party lives to fight another day and can reverse the bad policies of an intervening presidency.

The judiciary is different. On Jan. 20, 2009, six of the nine Supreme Court justices will be over 70. Most of them could be replaced by the next president, particularly if he or she is re-elected. Given the prospect of accelerating gains in modern medical technology, some of the new justices may serve for half a century. Even if a more perfect candidate were somehow elected in 2012, he would not be able to undo the damage, especially to the Supreme Court.

mccain.jpg

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